Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

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Masoretic Text

The Bible and the Masoretic Text

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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An Altar on Mt Ebal or Mt Gerizim: The Torah in the Sectarian Debate

The textual remnants of a Second Temple religious polemic between Judeans and Samaritans about where God’s chosen mountain lies.

Dr.

Jonathan Ben-Dov

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Mount Gerizim and the Polemic Against the Samaritans

Mount Gerizim appears in the Pentateuch as the mountain of blessing and plays a prominent role in Samaritan tradition, but the Jewish tradition sidelines this mountain and the Samaritans themselves in a polemic that began more than two and half thousand years ago.[1]

Dr.

Eyal Baruch

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Unspoken Hemorrhoids: Making the Torah Reading Polite

Two places in the Bible describe God striking people with hemorrhoids (ophalim): the curses in Parashat Ki Tavo and the story of the Philistines’ capture of the ark in 1 Samuel 5-6. In the latter, the Philistines make golden statues of their afflicted buttocks to propitiate the Israelite deity. Traditional readings replace these crass references with the less offensive term techorim (abscesses).

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Socio-Religious Background and Stabilization

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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Evaluating (Proto-)MT

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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“All of Jacob’s Descendants Numbered Seventy-Five”: The Opening of Exodus in the Dead Sea Scrolls

The Book of Exodus begins with an accounting of the members of Jacob's family who went with him to Egypt. Our Torah, the Masoretic Text, lists 70 people. Dead Sea Scroll manuscript 4QExb, however, records 75 people. How do we account for this and other differences between the texts?

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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Editions and Translations of MT

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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The Building Blocks of Biblical Interpretations: Text, Lexicon, and Grammar

Illustrations From Parashat Ekev

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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The Oldest Known Copy of the Decalogue?

A careful examination of the three oldest copies of the Decalogue—4QDeutn, 4QPaleoExodusm, and the Nash Papyrus—surprisingly shows that none of them reflects the Masoretic Text.

Dr.

Esther Eshel

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