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Concubine at Gibeah

Was There Ever an Ir Hannidahat (Subverted City)?

The rabbis claim that a “subverted” or “apostate” city, which Deuteronomy (13:13-18) condemns to destruction, “never was and never will be” (t. San. 14:1). Yet the account in Judges 19-21 of the destruction or ḥerem of Gibeah, its inhabitants, animals, and property, suggests that such “internal ḥerem” was an Israelite practice, and that Gibeah is being presented as a subverted city.

Prof.

Aaron Demsky

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The Israelite Conquest of Jerusalem in the Bible: When and Who?

The Bible records more than one conqueror, from Joshua to David to the tribe of Judah generally, spanning a period of more than three centuries.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Remedying Biblical Trauma with a Festival of Love

A Roman foundation myth is highly reminiscent of the abduction of the dancing girls in the book of Judges: A closer look at the Talmud’s description of Tu B’Av reveals a revolutionary, therapeutic recasting of the traumatic biblical story.

Dr.

Shraga Bar-On

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The Story of the Concubine at Gibeah: A Satire on King Saul

Why is the Benjaminite city of Gibeah portrayed as another Sodom—and who is the anonymous Levite from Ephraim who arrives there with his concubine?

Dr.

Sara Milstein

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