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Conversion

The Substance of Kinship: How Ruth the Moabite Became a Daughter in Judah

Ruth’s consumption of barley and wheat gleaned from the field of Boaz was an integral step in her transformation from a “foreigner” who arrived from the fields of Moab to a “daughter” in Judah.

Prof.

Cynthia Chapman

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In the Torah, Is the Ger Ever a Convert?

Conversion to Judaism as we know it is a rabbinic development, but what, then is the biblical ger, and why does he need to be circumcised in order to eat from the paschal offering?

Prof.

Ishay Rosen-Zvi

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Judaism's First Converts: A Pagan Priest and a Prostitute

Linked by words and acts of chesed (lovingkindness), Jethro and Rahab are rabbinic exemplars of true converts.

Dr. Rabbi

David J. Zucker

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Rabbi

Moshe Reiss

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Contrasting Pictures of Intermarriage in Ruth and Nehemiah

By comparing the aggressive approach of Nehemiah towards the foreign wives of the Judahites with the positive role of Ruth as a Moabite woman who married into an Israelite family, we can attempt to uncover the core messages about Jewish identity that the two texts have in common.

Prof.

Jacob L. Wright

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Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Ralbag's Surprising Take on Ruth's Conversion

Prof.

Menachem Kellner

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