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Conversion

The Substance of Kinship: How Ruth the Moabite Became a Daughter in Judah

Ruth’s consumption of barley and wheat gleaned from the field of Boaz was an integral step in her transformation from a “foreigner” who arrived from the fields of Moab to a “daughter” in Judah.

Prof.

Cynthia Chapman

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Judaism's First Converts: A Pagan Priest and a Prostitute

Linked by words and acts of chesed (lovingkindness), Jethro and Rahab (a pagan priest and a prostitute) are rabbinic exemplars of true converts.[1]

Dr. Rabbi

David J. Zucker

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Rabbi

Moshe Reiss

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Contrasting Pictures of Intermarriage in Ruth and Nehemiah

By comparing the aggressive approach of Nehemiah towards the non-Jewish wives of the Judahites with the positive role of Ruth as a Moabite woman who married into a Jewish family, we can attempt to uncover the core messages about Jewish identity that the two texts have in common, and what the reading of Ruth on Shavuot may represent. 

Dr.

Jacob L. Wright

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Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Ralbag's Surprising Take on Ruth's Conversion

Prof.

Menachem Kellner

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