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High Holidays

Lamentations in Seasonal Context

The reading of Lamentations on Tisha b’Av functions both as the climax of the three weeks of mourning and the beginning of the seven weeks of conciliation, which leads us into the High Holidays.[1]

Dr.

Elsie R. Stern

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How Much Forgiveness Can We Expect From God?

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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Does YHWH Remit Punishment?

As part of the selichot prayer service, the rabbis cut the biblical phrase וְנַקֵּה לֹא יְנַקֶּה “[YHWH] does not remit punishment” to read only וְנַקֵּה, which yields the opposite meaning, “[YHWH] remits punishment.” Although this edit is surprising, the rabbis are responding to a serious tension in the biblical text: Is YHWH a merciful God who pardons, or a vengeful God who will never remit punishment?

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Channa's Unconventional Prayer

Bringing "Different Voices" from the Margin to the Center of Religious Life

Dr.

Tova Hartman

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A Shofar-less "Rosh Hashanah": A Karaite's Experience of Yom Teru'ah

Shawn Joe Lichaa

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A Faith that Includes Doubt – Psalm 27

The psalm of the High Holiday season begins with the words “God is my light and my salvation,” moves to expressions of distress about God’s absence, and ends with a statement of hope. The psalm’s unexpected direction models the maturing of an authentic relationship with God.

Prof.

Benjamin D. Sommer

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