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Intertextuality

Anah Found Hayemim in the Wilderness: A Hidden Critique of Jacob’s Family

Genesis 36 references a story about Anah, the grandson of Seir the Horite and the father-in-law of Esau, who found הימם “Hayemim” while grazing his father's donkeys in the wilderness. What does this mean and why is this story in the Torah?

Rabbi

Shmuel Klitsner

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The Book of Job and its Paradoxical Relationship with the Akedah

The inscrutable story of the Akedah, can be better understood in light of its subversive sequel, the equally morally complex book of Job.

Judy Klitsner

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Torah’s Dynamic Truth

Judy Klitsner

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The Dinah Story: A Missed Opportunity for Intermarriage and Conversion

An intertextual reading of the Dinah story highlights how it polemicizes against marriage with non-Israelites, even those willing to take on Israelite practices. Some rabbinic counter-readings of the text, however, express a more positive notion of incorporating converts to Judaism into the community.

Naomi Graetz

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A Murderous Bridegroom

Dr.

Serge Frolov

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How Is It Possible that Jacob Mistakes Leah for Rachel?

“When morning came, there was Leah!” (Genesis 29:25). Could Jacob not tell the difference between Rachel, his beloved of seven years, and her sister Leah—for a whole night? Commentators have long tried to make sense of the story by adding extra details, but perhaps we need to rethink the nature of Jacob and Rachel’s relationship during those years.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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