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Manna

Shabbat with Food: From Biblical Prohibitions to Rabbinic Feasts

Biblical prohibitions against preparing food on Shabbat are further developed in the Second Temple and rabbinic periods. At the same time, a new emphasis emerges: celebrating Shabbat with festive meals.

Dr.

Sarit Kattan Gribetz

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Shabbat HaYom, HaYom, HaYom: Stylistic Repetition or Polemical Assertion?

Stylistic Repetition or Polemical Assertion that Shabbat Starts in the Morning?

Dr. Hacham

Isaac S. D. Sassoon

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Were the Israelites Craving for Meat or Starving for Food?

“There is nothing at all, nothing but this manna” (Num 11:6): How the manna tradition overtook the suffering in the wilderness tradition.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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Did God Bless Shabbat?

“And the Lord Blessed the Seventh Day and Consecrated It” (Genesis 2:3). Can time be blessed?

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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Manna and Mystical Eating

Ancient interpreters contemplated the substance of manna, a food that traverses the chasm between divine and mundane realms, falling from heaven to be consumed on earth. In kabbalistic thought, the Zohar presents manna as granting the desert generation an embodied experience of knowledge of God; such an opportunity is available to mystics in everyday eating and through birkat ha-mazon (Grace after Meals).

Prof.

Joel Hecker

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What Makes Something a Miracle?

Splitting the Sea, Manna from Heaven, and defeating Amalek.

Prof.

Michael Avioz

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