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Noah

The Flood Changes God Not Humanity

When YHWH sees the evil ways of humanity, he initially decides to wipe them out, but then determines to save Noah’s family. After the flood and Noah’s sacrifice, YHWH promises that He will never again destroy the earth and all life, even though humanity will continue in its evil ways. Thus, the story chronicles not the moral and emotional advancement of humanity but of YHWH.

Prof.

Ronald Hendel

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Noah, Hero of the Great Primeval Famine

Noah's name expresses his father's hope that Noah will bring comfort from the pain of the curse of the land, and before he plants his vineyard, he is called "a man of the land" (איש האדמה). These and other verses point to an older core narrative which spoke not of a flood but of a primeval famine that Noah brings to an end.

Dr.

Idan Dershowitz

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Noah, Ham and the Curse of Canaan: Who Did What to Whom in the Tent?

A new solution to why Canaan (not Ham) was cursed.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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Noah — A Relatable Ancestor of Humanity

Unlike Adam, Noah is born like a regular human, and unlike the flood hero Utnapishtim, and Noah's great-grandfather Enoch, Noah is mortal. Yet in Second Temple times, new retellings of his story presented him as something more than human. However, in rabbinic tradition, the biblical image of the all too human Noah prevails.

Dr.

Aryeh Amihay

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A Textual Study of Noah's Flood

Project TABS Editors

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The Flood Story in Its Ancient Near Eastern Context

Dr.

Shalom E. Holtz

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The Torah's Version of the Flood Story

Dr. Rabbi

Norman Solomon

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Noah's Original Identity: The First Winemaker

Before Noah became the protagonist of the Israelite flood story, his original place in Israelite historiography was as the ancient farmer who discovered wine, bringing the world relief from the toil of work caused by God’s cursing the soil.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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The Motif of Releasing Birds in ANE Flood Stories

The ancient Near East had many versions of the flood story, such as Atrahasis, Ziusudra, Utnapishtim, etc., most of which predate the Torah’s account of Noah’s flood. But what is the earliest extant version of the releasing birds motif?[1]

Dr.

Guy Darshan

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