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Revelation

YHWH’s Simulated Speech: The Priestly Interpretation of Prophecy

The use of the unusual verb מִדַּבֵּר, middabber in Numbers 7:89 suggests that YHWH does not speak to Moses in the literal and simple sense.

Prof.

Benjamin D. Sommer

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What Did the People Hear at Mount Sinai?

The answer, or lack thereof, teaches us something important about the meaning and limits of divine revelation.

Prof.

Kenneth Seeskin

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Revelation and Authority: Author’s Presentation

Prof.

Benjamin D. Sommer

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The Maimonidean Akedah

Dr.

Chaim Trachtman

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Torat Emet: A Torah that Truly Continues to Sustain

Dr. Rabbi

Daniel Gordis

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The Challenges of Ancient Near Eastern Antecedents to the Torah

Thoughts on Torah Min HaShamayim

Dr. Rabbi

Michael Harris

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Nehemiah 9: The First Historical Survey in the Bible to Mention Sinai and Torah

The revelation at Sinai emerged as central to Israel’s story in the Persian period. No biblical text outside the Torah mentions it until its unique inclusion in the historical prologue of the Levites’ prayer in Nehemiah 9:13-14. A later scribe redacted the Sinai verses to further include a reference to the Torah of Moses.

Prof.

Hava Shalom-Guy

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Revelation and Authority: Author’s Response

Prof.

Benjamin D. Sommer

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Shavuot: Why Doesn't the Torah Celebrate the Revelation on Mt. Sinai?

A Devar Torah inaugurating Project TABS / TheTorah.com

Rabbi

David D. Steinberg

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Shavuot: How the Festival of Harvest Grew

Dr. Rabbi

Norman Solomon

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A Hasidic Matan Torah

The Revelation of the Divine Voice Within 

Yoel S.

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Torah's Progressive Truth

Dr. Rabbi

Aaron Panken

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Broadening the Boundaries of Revelation and Authority

Dr. Rabbi

Michael Marmur

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Hearing God's Voice: Two Models for Accepting The Torah

By considering two moments in the Bible at which the people gather to hear God’s word: the revelation to Moses at Sinai in Exodus, and Ezra’s assembly in a Jerusalem square in Nehemiah, we can contrast the clear revelation we yearn for with the hidden revelation that upon reflection we should accept.

Prof.

Sam Fleischacker

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When the God of Justice Goes Rogue

YHWH commissions Isaiah to distract the people of Judah so that they continue to sin and then YHWH can punish them harshly. In contrast to other biblical figures such as Abraham and Moses, Isaiah is silent at this injustice.

Prof.

Marvin A. Sweeney

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A Torah of Participatory Revelation in Context

Situating Sommer’s theology of participatory revelation and halachic fluidity among other Jewish thinkers and writings: Heschel, Maharal, Rosenzweig, and the Zohar

Prof. Rabbi

Alexander Even-Chen

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Balaam and the Problem of Other People’s Revelation

A Pagan “Prophet Like Moses”

Dr.

Seth Sanders

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Sensing Balaam's Divine Moment: Prophecy as Poetry

Prof.

Everett Fox

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