Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

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Covenant Collection

The Torah’s Use of Mise en Abyme

After Sinai, Moses writes down YHWH’s Laws on a scroll and reads it to the people (Exodus 24). Similarly, Moses writes down the Deuteronomic Torah, which will be read to the people every seven years (Deuteronomy 31). Using the literary mirroring technique, mise en abyme, the Torah connects its authority to these ancient scrolls on one hand, and its readers with the ancient Israelite audience on the other.

Prof.

Jean-Pierre Sonnet

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Deathblows to a Pregnant Woman – What Restitution Was Required?

When a man accidentally kills a pregnant woman in a brawl, Exodus requires him to pay “life for a life.” This is generally understood as either capital punishment or monetary repayment. Its legal formulation in context, however, suggests substitution, i.e., the offender has to hand over a woman from his own family.

Dr.

Sandra Jacobs

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How Exodus Revises the Laws of Hammurabi

The author of the Covenant Collection in Exodus knew the Laws of Hammurabi and revised them to fit with Israelite legal and ethical conceptions. This is clear when we compare their laws of assault in each.

Prof.

David P. Wright

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What Was the Sin of the Golden Calf?

Many scholars, traditional and academic, believe it was worship of another god, the first commandment in the Decalogue, but what Aaron actually claims about the calf points to a different collection of laws.

Prof.

Joel Baden

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The Hebrew Slave: Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy

A classic example of source criticism applied to Torah legislation.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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The Rape of the Unbetrothed Virgin in Torah and Assyrian Law

A Comparative Analysis

Dr.

Eve Levavi Feinstein

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The Bible’s Evolving Effort to Humanize Debt Slavery

. . . and the Challenges of Putting it into Practice.

Prof.

Marvin A. Sweeney

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