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Spies

a.k.a. Scouts

Did the Exodus Generation Die in the Wilderness or Enter Canaan?

In the context of the Pentateuch, Deuteronomy is read as a continuation of Numbers, in which God decrees that the exodus generation must wander in the wilderness until they have all died, and that only their children may enter the land. Yet Deuteronomy's core narrative presents Moses addressing the same Israelites who left Egypt and wandered forty years in the wilderness on the eve of their entry into the Promised Land.

Dr.

Gili Kugler

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Were Rahab's Sisters Saved?

Making sense of small differences between biblical lists: a look at the merit of different reading strategies.

Dr.

Shira Golani

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Whose Idea Was It to Send Scouts?

Project TABS Editors

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Using Deuteronomy to Fill in the Lacunae of Numbers’ Spies Story

Moses refers to the story of the spies in Deuteronomy 1. The details that overlap with Numbers fit only with the (incomplete) J version of the account. How are the two versions connected and what new details can we learn from comparing them?

Dr.

David Ben-Gad HaCohen

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Who Were the Loyal Scouts?

Caleb and Joshua or only Caleb?

 

Project TABS Editors

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The Backstory of the Spy Account

Early Judahite authors supplemented ancient Israelite traditions of conquest through the Transjordan with the spy story to explain why Israel entered Canaan from the east rather than from the south.

Dr.

Jacob L. Wright

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Unscrambling the Scout Story with the Documentary Hypothesis

Project TABS Editors

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The Scout Story: A Guided Reading

Dr.

Rachel Havrelock

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לכו נרננה From the Story of the Spies to the return of the Judahite exiles

A New Reading of Psalm 95

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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