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Egypt, Culture

Pharaoh and Joseph Speak of a Common God to Save Egypt

Before speaking with Pharaoh, Joseph adapts to Egyptian norms by shaving and changing his clothes. When he interprets Pharaoh’s dream, he only uses the generic word for God, Elohim, making no mention of YHWH. Pharaoh, in turn, declares Joseph to be wise and a man with the spirit of God, and puts aside Joseph’s ethnic and socio-economic background, appointing him viceroy to save Egypt from the pending famine.

Prof.

Safwat Marzouk

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The Poles of the Ark and Tutankhamun’s Chest

The description of what is to be done with the ark’s carrying poles (בַּדִּים) seems to differ between Exodus ch. 25 and Numbers 4. Medieval Jewish commentators offered many different solutions to this contradiction, but the best answer lies in what we learn from the construction of ancient Egyptian portable chests.[1]

Dr.

Raanan Eichler

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The Joseph Story: Ancient Literary Art at Its Best

The Joseph story invites the reader to be transported to Egypt itself through the inclusion of Egyptian words, proper names, and customs; to analyze the unsurpassed use of repetition with variation; and to enter the mind of the character (in this case, especially Pharaoh) through the use of interior monologue.

Prof.

Gary Rendsburg

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The Title “Pharaoh”

The change in usage over time and what this tells us about the biblical text

Dr.

Shirly Ben-Dor Evian

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Sacrificing a Lamb in Egypt

When a Temple of Yahu Stood Near a Temple of Khnum

Prof.

Jan Assmann

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Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Pharaoh's Divine Role in Maintaining Ma'at (Order)

Prof.

Jan Assmann

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Shepherds and Eating with Hebrews: An Abomination to the Egyptians?

Prof.

Jan Assmann

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Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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