Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

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Education

Text and Context: Torah and Historical Truth

Historical-critical and text-critical approaches to the Torah have a strong precedent in classical rabbinic literature. Yet Orthodox Jewish communities today pointedly resist these methods. It is time that critical thinking about the Torah be embraced within our educational systems.

Dr.

Barry Levy

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On Becoming a Critical Torah Scholar

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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The Psychological Mechanisms that Protect Unreasonable Faith Claims

Prof.

Solomon Schimmel

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Why Now? Toward a Sociology of Knowledge Analysis of TheTorah.com

The interest in Project TABS – TheTorah.com has been widespread across many communities, but the extensive interest in the Orthodox community may seem surprising for some, and likely would not have been the case a decade ago. In this essay, Prof. Chaim Waxman, a prominent scholar of Jewish sociology, offers an analysis of why the approach taken by TABS has found such a large audience among the Orthodox at this time.

Prof.

Chaim I. Waxman

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Afflicting the Soul: A Day When Even Children Must Fast

The Israelite-Samaritan interpretation of “you should afflict your souls” (ועניתם את נפשתיכם) and our experience of Yom Kippur.

Benyamim Tsedaka

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Embracing Academic Torah Study: Modern Orthodoxy's Challenge

The study of biblical criticism cuts to the very meaning of the value system of Modern Orthodoxy, i.e. forging a distinctive synthesis of modern culture with traditional values.

Dr.

Steven Bayme

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A Precariously Fragile Torah

Moses and R. Judah HaNasi implore: “I would be most grateful if you would maintain the Torah after me.”[1]

Prof.

Steven Fraade

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Biblical Authority: A Jewish Pluralistic View

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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An Honest Discussion with High School Students

Rabbi

Lee Buckman

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Can Orthodox Education Survive Biblical Criticism?

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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My Encounter with the Firmament

The Torah describes God’s fashioning the firmament (רקיע) on the second day of creation. This piece of the universe, however, doesn’t actually exist—a problem obfuscated in my yeshiva education.

Oren Fass M.D.

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