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Suffering

The Book of Job and its Paradoxical Relationship with the Akedah

In an effort to make greater sense of the inscrutable story of the Akedah and its relationship to the equally morally complex book of Job, some unconventional exegetical methods are called for. The aim of this essay is to apply two such methods, both of which are literary in nature. The first entails reading the Akedah in light of its subversive sequel. The second calls for a non-linear, post-modern reading of the biblical narrative.

Judy Klitsner

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Naomi's Bitter Poem

A look at Naomi’s theology, as expressed in her poem, and how it carries her through her grief and back into productive engagement.

Prof. Rabbi

Jonathan Magonet

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The Golden Calf: Comparing the Two Versions

Exodus versus Deuteronomy

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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The "Man" in Lamentations

Unlike the other four chapters where the author speaks for the community, the third chapter of Lamentations is written as an individual lament. The chapter begins with “I am the man who has known affliction,” but who is he?

Prof.

Jacob Klein

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Communicating Catastrophe

“Great as the Sea is Your Breaking” (Lamentations 2:13) 

Dr.

Tzvi Novick

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"God Opened Her Womb": The Biblical Conception of Fertility

Is infertility a divine punishment? 

Prof.

Joel Baden

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