Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

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Kosher

What Kinds of Fish Were Eaten in Ancient Jerusalem?

Fishbone remains discovered in eight different excavations in Jerusalem, from the Iron age to the early Islamic period, give us a sense of what fish the locals ate, and from where they were imported.

Prof.

Omri Lernau, M.D.

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Are Biblical Dietary Laws Meant to Keep Israelites Separate?

How does the Torah envision that keeping kosher makes a person holy?[1]

Dr. Rabbi

David M. Freidenreich

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The Animal Laws Before Kashrut: A System of Purity

The dietary laws in Vayikra are not expressed in terms of kosher (כשר) or not kosher but in the terms of the Priestly purity laws: purity (טהרה), pollution (טומאה), and disgust (שקץ).

Dr.

Eve Levavi Feinstein

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Why Chicken and Cheese Became Prohibited

But Chicken and Egg Remained Permitted

Dr.

Jordan D. Rosenblum

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Do Animals Feel Pain? Balaam’s Donkey vs. Descartes

In contrast to Descartes’ theory of animals as automatons, the Torah and rabbinic text express deep concern for animal suffering. One vivid example is the donkey’s rebuke of Balaam, “What have I done to you, that you have struck me?” (Num 22:28).

Prof.

Yael Shemesh

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Meeting the Challenge of Critical Scholarship with Leviticus

Dr. Rabbi

Irving (Yitz) Greenberg

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Biblical Exegesis as a Source of Jewish Pluralism: The Case of the Karaites

Karaism is often characterized by its rejection of the Talmud in favor of a super-literalist interpretation of the Torah. But Karaism is better understood as an alternate, parallel form of Judaism based on the Bible.

Prof.

Daniel J. Lasker

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