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Song of the Sea

A Personified Reed Sea

A seemingly midrashic interpretation of the the verb נערמו neʿermu in the Song of the Sea finds support in a variant text of Deuteronomy 11:4, preserved both in the Kennicott Bible and the medieval commentator Ḥizquni, that  imagines the Reed Sea in purposive pursuit of the Egyptians.[1]

Dr.

David Rothstein

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Exodus: Not the Only Tradition About Israel's Past

The Torah implores us to remember and teach the exodus, yet surprisingly, some biblical passages seem unaware of this event and describe an alternative tradition: God found Israel in the wilderness.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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The Historical Exodus

The Evidence for the Levites Leaving Egypt and the Introduction of YHWH into Israel

Prof.

Richard Elliott Friedman

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Enthroning God in the Temple with the Song of the Sea

The Song of the Sea begins with defeat of the Egyptians and ends with YHWH’s enthronement in His temple. Comparison with the Epic of Baal and Enuma Elish clarify the genre and purpose of such hymns, and a striking parallel with Solomon’s prayer in 1 Kings 8 offers a clue to the original context of this ancient song.

Rabbi

Daniel M. Zucker

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The Song of the Sea and the History of Ancient Israel and Judah

Exploring ten aspects of the Song’s narrative and what they tell us about its origins.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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Does God Split the Sea in the Song of the Sea?

DovBear

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The Song at the Sea: What Does it Celebrate?

Prof.

Baruch J. Schwartz

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