Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use

Tower of Babel

The Human Desire to Be Godlike

The stories of Enosh, Noah, Nimrod, the Tower of Babel, and the marriage of the “sons of God” to human women (Genesis 4–11) all feature the Leitwort החל “began,” signaling an attempt to be more than just human.

Prof.

James A. Diamond

,

,

The Tower of Babel: A Polemic against Marduk’s Temple Esagil

Enuma Elish describes the Babylonian god Marduk’s plans for a city with a single tower that will serve as his seat of power and as the nexus of all gods. The story of Babel responds to this myth by having YHWH disrupt the construction and decentralize Babylon.

Prof.

Takayoshi M. Oshima

,

,

Nimrod: The Making of a Nemesis

Genesis describes Nimrod as a great hunter before YHWH and a powerful king. In late Second Temple writings, Nimrod is connected to the Tower of Babel and seen as a rebel against God. This negative view of Nimrod persisted through the centuries in the writings of the Church Fathers, and was further expanded in rabbinic midrash and medieval Islamic literature.

Prof.

Carol Bakhos

,

,

The Cities of Nebo and Baʿal-Meon Were “Musabot Shem”

What does this phrase, found in Numbers 32:38, mean?

Dr.

Mordecai David Rosen

,

,

Language Is Baffling – The Story of the Tower of Babel

The Tower of Babel story (Genesis 11:1-9) is not only about the downfall of Babylon or the origin of languages. It is a reflection on how languages work differently, on the limitations of one language to convey the sense of another, and the insufficiency inherent in translation.

Prof.

Edward L. Greenstein

,

,

Tower of Babel: The Hidden Transcript

The Tower of Babel story is a marvelous tale about the ambition and hubris of primal humanity, with a biting political message and dark insights into the human condition.

Prof.

Ronald Hendel

,

,

What Really Happened at Mount Sinai?

Four Answers to One Question

Prof.

Baruch J. Schwartz

,

,

No items found.
Clicky