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Lamentations, Book

Tisha B'Av with Queen Esther

Dr. Rabbi

Laura Lieber

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An Introduction to Lamentations

Prof.

Adele Berlin

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Lamentations in Seasonal Context

The reading of Lamentations on Tisha b’Av functions both as the climax of the three weeks of mourning and the beginning of the seven weeks of conciliation, which leads us into the High Holidays.[1]

Dr.

Elsie R. Stern

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Parents Eating their Children – The Torah's Curse and Its Undertones in Medieval Interpretation

Early rabbinic interpretation connected the curse of child eating (Lev 26:29; Deut 28:53-57) with the description of the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in Lamentations (2:20 and 4:10) and the Roman destruction of the Second Temple. In the Middle Ages, however, Jewish commentators de-emphasize this connection. The reason for this may lie in the 12th c. development of Christian Bible commentary.

Dr.

Wendy Love Anderson

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The "Man" in Lamentations

Unlike the other four chapters where the author speaks for the community, the third chapter of Lamentations is written as an individual lament. The chapter begins with “I am the man who has known affliction,” but who is he?

Prof.

Jacob Klein

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Communicating Catastrophe

“Great as the Sea is Your Breaking” (Lamentations 2:13) 

Dr.

Tzvi Novick

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Relating to God in Calamity

The Approaches in Lamentations

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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Voices in Lamentations: Dialogues in Trauma

Prof.

Edward L. Greenstein

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Lamenting with Job: The Karaite Version of the Fasts for Jerusalem

In keeping with the verses, Karaite Jews fast on the 9th of Tammuz, beginning the five weeks of mourning, which culminates with the dual fasts on the 7th and 10th of Av.[1]

Tomer Rami Mangoubi

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The Sumerian City Laments and the Book of Lamentations

A Comparative Theological View

Dr.

Nili Samet

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An Honest Discussion with High School Students

Rabbi

Lee Buckman

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Pe before Ayin in Biblical Pre-Exilic Acrostics

Abecedaries uncovered in pre-exilic Israel and Judah suggest that in their Hebrew alphabet, ayin followed pe. This order is attested in a number of biblical acrostics, some of which have been corrected by later scribes to make them fit what eventually became the standard ayin-pe order.[1]

Mitchell First

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The Genre of Lamentations

In the ancient Near East, laments were written to mourn past destructions or to prevent future destructions. With which type of lament were the authors of Lamentations familiar?

Dr.

Uri Gabbay

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