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Curses

Parents Eating their Children – The Torah's Curse and Its Undertones in Medieval Interpretation

Early rabbinic interpretation connected the curse of child eating (Lev 26:29; Deut 28:53-57) with the description of the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in Lamentations (2:20 and 4:10) and the Roman destruction of the Second Temple. In the Middle Ages, however, Jewish commentators de-emphasize this connection. The reason for this may lie in the 12th c. development of Christian Bible commentary.

Dr.

Wendy Love Anderson

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God's Flaming Fiery Anger

Dr.

Deena Grant

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The Novel Introduction of Blessings into our Treaty with God

Dr. Rabbi

Pamela Barmash

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Unspoken Hemorrhoids: Making the Torah Reading Polite

Two places in the Bible describe God striking people with hemorrhoids (ophalim): the curses in Parashat Ki Tavo and the story of the Philistines’ capture of the ark in 1 Samuel 5-6. In the latter, the Philistines make golden statues of their afflicted buttocks to propitiate the Israelite deity. Traditional readings replace these crass references with the less offensive term techorim (abscesses).

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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The Proper Response to a Gestapo's Taunt?

Dr. Rabbi

Amit Kula

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How Do We Conceive the Divine?

Prof.

Marvin A. Sweeney

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Cathartic Cursing

A Therapeutic Outlet for Terrible Pain

Dr. Rabbi

Jeremy Rosen

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Comparing Curses

Leviticus 26 and Deuteronomy 28 are often lumped together, as the two great curses, but their careful comparison reveals some fundamental and surprising differences.

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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“Cursed Is One Who Does Not Uphold the Words of This Torah”?

The anomalous and paradoxical nature of the twelfth curse (Deuteronomy 27:26).

Rabbi

Uzi Weingarten

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Noah's Original Identity: The First Winemaker

Before Noah became the protagonist of the Israelite flood story, his original place in Israelite historiography was as the ancient farmer who discovered wine, bringing the world relief from the toil of work caused by God’s cursing the soil.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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