Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use

Genealogies

Nimrod, Mighty Hunter and King - Who Was He?

Nimrod’s bio begins in the 23rd century B.C.E. with King Sargon of Akkad and his grandson Naram-Sin.

Prof.

Yigal Levin

,

,

Did Israel Always Have Twelve Tribes?

The Bible presents Israel as having twelve tribes from both northern Israel and southern Judah. In older northern lists, however, the southern tribes do not appear, and the full list seems to have developed in Judah, after the destruction of Israel. Moreover, the idea that the tribes are descended from Jacob developed even later.

Dr.

Andrew Tobolowsky

,

,

Manasseh’s Genealogies: Why They Change Between Numbers, Joshua, and Chronicles

The genealogy of the tribe of Manasseh appears in Numbers 26 and again in Joshua 17 with slight differences. It appears a third time, in 1 Chronicles 7, wholly reconceived. This highlights how certain biblical genealogies represent tribal kinship patterns that shift over time.

Prof.

Aaron Demsky

,

,

How All Kohanim Became Sons of Aaron

The Bible knows about many priestly families, including the Levites, the Mushites (descendants of Moses), and the Zadokites. By the time of Ezra and Chronicles, however, only Aaronide priests were legitimate, and other families either merged with them or were demoted.

Prof.

Mark Leuchter

,

,

Israel’s History as a Family Narrative

Behind the story of Jacob’s struggle with his older twin Esau, stands a political allegory, reflecting how Israel (=Jacob) first dominated Edom (=Esau) in the 10th-9th centuries and then lost control over it in the late 8th century.

Prof.

Marvin A. Sweeney

,

,

What Do Genealogies Teach Us About Torah?

Project TABS Editors

,

,

What Was Caleb the Kenizzite's Connection to Hebron?

Did Caleb receive the Negev or Hebron? Is he a Judahite, a Calebite or a Kenizzite? The redacted account of Caleb in the Bible reflects the developing realities of southern Judah in the First and Second Temple periods.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

,

Prof.

Jacob L. Wright

,

Who Was Rebekah's Father?

“I am the daughter of Betuel the son of Milkah, whom she bore to Nahor” (Gen 24:24) – Why the unusual and cumbersome genealogical description?[1]

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

,

,

Decoding the Table of Nations: Reading it as a Map

The key: Where was the author of the Table of Nations in Genesis 10 located?

Dr.

David Ben-Gad HaCohen

,

,

Reading Biblical Genealogies

Genealogical lists are often overlooked, and yet they represent a distinct biblical literary genre with ideological content. What messages are these lists meant to convey?

Prof.

Aaron Demsky

,

,

Moses, Aaron, and Miriam: Were They Siblings?

The significance—or lack thereof—of family pedigree in matters of individual excellence and righteousness.

Dr. Hacham

Isaac S. D. Sassoon

,

,

Moses’ Father-in-Law: Kenite or Midianite?

In the ancient world, genealogy was not about family relations but about political alliances.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

,

,

Motivating the Leadership of Israel – Plan B

Rabbi

Yoseif Bloch

,

,

Jacob’s Descendants Who Go to Egypt: MT Versus LXX

The names and numbers of Jacob’s descendants differ between the Masoretic Text (MT) and the Septuagint (LXX). Which tradition is more original, and what prompted the change?

Prof.

Itamar Kislev

,

,

How Many Years Were the Israelites in Egypt?

Exodus 12:40 declares that the Israelites were in Egypt for 430 years, yet evidence from other biblical texts suggests a much shorter sojourn.

Dr.

David Glatt-Gilad

,

,

No items found.