Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use

Piyyut

Yom Kippur’s Seder Avodah Begins with God’s Creation of the World

Arguably, the highlight of the prayer service on Yom Kippur is the Seder Avodah, a type of piyyut (liturgical hymn) that poetically reenacts in every detail the ritual service performed by the high priest on Yom Kippur in the Jerusalem Temple. But why do these poems begin with the creation story?

Prof. Rabbi

Dalia Marx

,

,

Tisha B'Av with Queen Esther

Dr. Rabbi

Laura Lieber

,

,

"Let Me Flee to My Helper": A Rosh Hashanah Love Poem

Yose ben Yose’s 4th century CE piyyut for the shofarot service, and its creative use of the Song of Songs.

Dr. Rabbi

Laura Lieber

,

,

Ma'oz Tzur and the "End of Christianity"

Ma’oz Tzur is an intense anti-Christian text reflecting the mood and experience of Ashkenazi Jews during the Crusades, when dozens of Jewish communities were slaughtered in the name of the cross.[1] 

Prof.

Yitzhak Y. Melamed

,

,

The Piyyut (Poem) Akdamut Milin

The Enigma and Perseverance of Tradition

Dr. Rabbi

Laura Lieber

,

,

God's Coronation on Rosh Hashanah

What Kind of King?

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

,

,

Malchuyot: Is God King Now or Only in the Future?

On Rosh Hashanah, we pray for the future exclusive divine kingship presented in Aleinu. At the same time, the psalm of the shofar (Ps 47) offers us an alternative approach, to stop waiting for God’s eschatological intervention and start seeing kinship with other religious groups, all of whom are the “Am Elohei Avraham,” the retinue of the God of Abraham.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

,

,