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Seder

Shankbone and Egg: How They Became Symbols on the Seder Plate

The Talmud requires having two unspecified cooked dishes to be eaten as part of the Passover meal. How did this requirement develop into the custom of placing two particular symbolic foods, the shankbone and the egg, on the seder plate?

Dr.

Joshua Kulp

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Spilling Wine While Reciting the Plagues “To Diminish Our Joy”?

The popular Jewish custom to remove drops of wine while listing the plagues goes back to the Middle Ages, but the ubiquitous explanation that we do this out of sadness for what happened to the Egyptians does not. When did this explanation develop and how did it become so dominant?

Dr. Rabbi

Zvi Ron

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Not What Happened But What Should Happen Now

Rabbi

Yuval Cherlow

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A Conduit to the Divine That Enriches Our Lives

Dr. Rabbi

Jeremy Rosen

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Refracting History Through the Spiritual Experience of the Present

Rabbi

David Bigman

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Korban Chagigah from the Torah to the Seder Plate

Dr. Rabbi

Robert Harris

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The Right Way to Read the Haggadah

The Seder as a Night of Hermeneutic Freedom: Introducing the Four Readers of the Haggadah

Dr. Rabbi

Norman Solomon

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Finding Redemption in the Passover Story

Doing history one better

Prof. Rabbi

Burton L. Visotzky

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Passover and the Festival of Matzot: Synthesizing Two Holidays

Prof.

Michael L. Satlow

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Connecting the Mitzvah of Maggid to the Seder Night

...יָכוֹל מֵראשׁ חֹדֶשׁ? תַּלְמוּד לוֹמַר בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא

Dr.

Azzan Yadin-Israel

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