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Rebecca

A Wife for Isaac: From Abraham's Hometown or Family?

Abraham’s servant says that his master told him to take a wife for Isaac from his family, but Abraham said no such thing. Why does the servant say this and why did medieval pashtanim ignore this blatant discrepancy?[1]

Prof. Rabbi

Marty Lockshin

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A Monogamous Isaac Prays for His Barren Wife

Midrash Chad Shenati, discovered in the Cairo Genizah, criticizes Abraham for not praying for Sarah and praises Isaac for praying for Rebekah, and gives Rebekah pride of place in its homiletic exposition of the parasha.

Dr.

Shana Strauch-Schick

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Dr.

Moshe Lavee

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Who Was Rebekah's Father?

“I am the daughter of Betuel the son of Milkah, whom she bore to Nahor” (Gen 24:24) – Why the unusual and cumbersome genealogical description?[1]

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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The Source of Jacob's Two Blessings

Project TABS Editors

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Rebekah Ran to her "Mother's Household": Where Was her Father?

Betuel, Rebekah’s father, mysteriously appears and disappears in the negotiations over Rebekah’s marriage.[1]

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Rabbi

Daniel M. Zucker

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Looking Through the Window: A Gendered Motif

Abimelech, Michal, Sisera’s mother, and Jezebel all look through a window, but their experience is not the same.

Prof.

Aaron Demsky

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Giving Miriam and the Matriarchs their Proper Funerals

The Bible pays little attention to the death of its female characters, writing only cursory death notices, or sometimes none at all. Second Temple period authors, retell the Torah’s stories to give more pride of place to the death scenes of its heroines. 

Dr.

Atar Livneh

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Anxiety over Twins: Anthropological Insights into the Story of Jacob and Esau

Dr.

Kristine Henriksen Garroway

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The Mitzvah of Covering the Blood of Wild Animals

Leviticus requires covering the blood of undomesticated animals; Deuteronomy requires pouring out the blood of slaughtered domesticated animals onto the ground. How do these laws jibe with each other? The Essenes have one answer, the rabbis another, the academics a third.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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