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Ruth, Book

Boaz Married Ruth at the Threshing Floor: A Grammatical Solution to Ruth 4:5

Boaz’s speech to the unnamed kinsman (Ruth 4:5) is difficult. By interpreting one element as an enclitic mem, as found in Eblaite, and by making use of the alternative textual option known as the ketiv, a new meaning for Boaz’s claim emerges.

Prof.

Gary Rendsburg

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The Substance of Kinship: How Ruth the Moabite Became a Daughter in Judah

Ruth’s consumption of barley and wheat gleaned from the field of Boaz was an integral step in her transformation from a “foreigner” who arrived from the fields of Moab to a “daughter” in Judah.

Prof.

Cynthia Chapman

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Megillat Ruth: When Kindness conflicts with Torah

A tale of chesed and chuzpah

Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Acquiring Ruth with the Land: A Text-Critical Solution for Ruth 4:5

How the mistaken exchange of the letter gimel for a vav corrupted the meaning of a key verse in Ruth

Dr.

Raanan Eichler

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Contrasting Pictures of Intermarriage in Ruth and Nehemiah

By comparing the aggressive approach of Nehemiah towards the non-Jewish wives of the Judahites with the positive role of Ruth as a Moabite woman who married into a Jewish family, we can attempt to uncover the core messages about Jewish identity that the two texts have in common, and what the reading of Ruth on Shavuot may represent. 

Dr.

Jacob L. Wright

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Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Naomi's Bitter Poem

A look at Naomi’s theology, as expressed in her poem, and how it carries her through her grief and back into productive engagement.

Prof. Rabbi

Jonathan Magonet

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Gleanings for the Poor – Justice, Not Charity

The agricultural allocations for the poor outlined in Leviticus and Deuteronomy are a series of negative commandments, in which God forbids Israelite householders from gathering some of their produce and requires them to leave it for the poor. The rabbis took these laws a step further, granting the poor property rights over the allocations even before they are gathered.

Dr.

Gregg E. Gardner

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Recasting David’s Foreign Origins

The book of Ruth tells the story of David’s great grandmother Ruth, a Moabite woman who attaches herself to a Judahite family. Could this have been designed as a positive spin for a persistent, problematic tradition about David’s foreignness—a tradition so controversial that it was excised from the rest of the Bible?

Dr.

Yael Avrahami

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Ralbag's Surprising Take on Ruth's Conversion

Prof.

Menachem Kellner

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Achieving Justice Through Narrative

The book of Ruth presents a different model of justice from that afforded by statute, custom, and precedent, one that seeks restorative as opposed to retributive justice.[1]  

Dr. Rabbi

Pamela Barmash

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Key Characteristics of (Proto-) MT

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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