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Ruth, Book

The Defamation of Orpah

Chesed, lovingkindness, is a major theme in the book of Ruth. And yet, the rabbis have little sympathy for Orpah. To the contrary!

Dr.

Barry Dov Walfish

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Boaz Married Ruth at the Threshing Floor: A Grammatical Solution to Ruth 4:5

Boaz’s speech to the unnamed kinsman (Ruth 4:5) is difficult. By interpreting one element as an enclitic mem, as found in Eblaite, and by making use of the alternative textual option known as the ketiv, a new meaning for Boaz’s claim emerges.

Prof.

Gary Rendsburg

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The Substance of Kinship: How Ruth the Moabite Became a Daughter in Judah

Ruth’s consumption of barley and wheat gleaned from the field of Boaz was an integral step in her transformation from a “foreigner” who arrived from the fields of Moab to a “daughter” in Judah.

Prof.

Cynthia Chapman

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Megillat Ruth: When Kindness Conflicts with Torah

A tale of chesed and chuzpah

Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Acquiring Ruth with the Land: A Text-Critical Solution for Ruth 4:5

How the mistaken exchange of the letter gimel for a vav corrupted the meaning of a key verse in Ruth

Dr.

Raanan Eichler

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Contrasting Pictures of Intermarriage in Ruth and Nehemiah

By comparing the aggressive approach of Nehemiah towards the foreign wives of the Judahites with the positive role of Ruth as a Moabite woman who married into an Israelite family, we can attempt to uncover the core messages about Jewish identity that the two texts have in common.

Prof.

Jacob L. Wright

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Prof. Rabbi

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

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Naomi's Bitter Poem

A look at Naomi’s theology, as expressed in her poem, and how it carries her through her grief and back into productive engagement.

Prof. Rabbi

Jonathan Magonet

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Gleanings for the Poor – Justice, Not Charity

The agricultural allocations for the poor outlined in Leviticus and Deuteronomy are a series of negative commandments, in which God forbids Israelite householders from gathering some of their produce and requires them to leave it for the poor. The rabbis took these laws a step further, granting the poor property rights over the allocations even before they are gathered.

Dr.

Gregg E. Gardner

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Recasting David’s Foreign Origins

The book of Ruth tells the story of David’s great grandmother Ruth, a Moabite woman who attaches herself to a Judahite family. Could this have been designed as a positive spin for a persistent, problematic tradition about David’s foreignness—a tradition so controversial that it was excised from the rest of the Bible?

Dr.

Yael Avrahami

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Ralbag's Surprising Take on Ruth's Conversion

Prof.

Menachem Kellner

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Achieving Justice Through Narrative

The book of Ruth presents a different model of justice from that afforded by statute, custom, and precedent, one that seeks restorative as opposed to retributive justice.[1]  

Prof. Rabbi

Pamela Barmash

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Key Characteristics of (Proto-) MT

Prof.

Emanuel Tov

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