Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

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Agriculture

What Was Life like in Biblical Times?

The Bible focuses on questions of religion and politics, overwhelmingly emphasizing city life at the expense of rural life. Archaeology, in contrast, can help us to better understand the life of most Israelites, who did not live in cities, and supplies a better understanding of such mundane questions as what they did for a living and what they ate.

Prof.

Oded Borowski

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The Essence of the Hebrew Calendar

Celebrating Multiple News Year’s Days to Express Multiple Values: Nature and History, Universal and Particular

Prof.

Aaron Demsky

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Permission to Eat from Your Neighbor's Field?

Prof. Rabbi

Shaye J. D. Cohen

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A Torah-Prescribed Liturgy: The Declaration of the First Fruits

A look at the Torah and Mishnah’s treatment of the mitzvah of bringing bikkurim (first fruits) to the Temple and its associated requirement to recite a historical confession through five prisms: phenomenological, historical, anthropological, feminist and liturgical.[1]

Prof. Rabbi

Dalia Marx

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The Origins of Sukkot

The connection between the Israelite festival of Sukkot in the temple and the Ugaritic new year festival and its dwellings of branches for the gods.  

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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The Evolution of Civilization: The Biblical Story

Reading Cain’s murder of Abel and the account of Cain’s descendants as a metaphor for the trajectory of human development and the change in patterns of human behavior.

Dr. Rabbi

Samuel Z. Glaser

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Integrating the Exodus Story into the Festivals

The exodus story, which is presented as the basis for many of the Torah’s rituals, is a secondary insertion in many of these contexts.

Dr. Rabbi

David Frankel

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The Jubilee Real Estate Law

Cities vs. Villages or Houses vs. Farmsteads? A New Insight based on Archaeology  

Prof.

Avraham (Avi) Faust

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Shabbat of the Full Moon

Early biblical laws also demand a cessation of labor every seven days, but originally had nothing to do with Shabbat. Before it came to designate the seventh day in a weekly cycle, Shabbat referred to the time of Full Moon, which together with New Moon was widely observed throughout the ancient Near East.

Dr.

Jacob L. Wright

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