Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use

Biblical Criticism

Difficulties for the Modern Believer

Prof.

Tamar Ross

,

,

The Significance of Hittite Treaties for Biblical Studies and Orthodox Judaism

Dr.

Yitzhaq Feder

,

,

On Becoming a Critical Torah Scholar

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

,

,

My Name Is Yoel, I Am a Satmar Hasid and a Bible Critic

Sharing his religious journey into biblical scholarship, a young married Hasidic man challenges the Modern Orthodox world to lead where his community cannot. 

Yoel S.

,

,

Current Approaches to Revelation and Torah

Project TABS Editors

,

,

Seven Defenses Against Biblical Criticism

Understanding the Other Side

Dr. Rabbi

Lawrence Grossman

,

,

Sukkot in Ezra-Nehemiah and the Date of the Torah

According to Ezra (3:4) and Nehemiah (8:14-15) the returnees celebrated the holiday of Sukkot according to the law as it “was written,” but differences between their celebrations and the prescriptions in the Torah suggest that the laws they had written were slightly different than ours. Was the Torah finalized by the time Ezra-Nehemiah was written?

Dr.

Lisbeth S. Fried

,

,

Psalm 137:9 - A Verse to Criticize

A Historical-Critical Reading 

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

,

,

Torah min haShamayim: Conflicts Between Religious Belief and Scientific Thinking

Dr.

Daniel Jackson

,

,

The Epistemic Standards of Biblical Scholarship

Sommer asks, “Can observant Judaism and modern biblical scholarship happily and honestly co-exist?” I’m concerned only with honesty, and will argue that Sommer’s theology fails to give an account of authoritativeness consistent with a commitment to biblical scholarship.

Prof. Rabbi

Jonathan W. Malino

,

,

Modern Faith in Sinai

Notwithstanding modern day biblical critical and historical critical claims, applying the tools of contemporary philosophy demonstrates how room still exists to have faith that something extraordinary happened to our ancestors and that this event had a permanent effect on the development of Torah and Judaism.

Dr. Rabbi

Samuel Lebens

,

,

Knowing My Beloved: Rebuilding My Path to Torah with Critical Scholarship

My relationship with Torah began with the romance of mysticism but then gave way to skepticism and disillusionment. To my surprise, it was academic scholarship of the Torah that brought back the spark and helped foster a deeper, more mature relationship.

David Bar-Cohn

,

,

The Song of the Well, Psalm 136, Was Removed from the Torah

R. Yehudah HaChasid Radical Suggestion

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

,

,

Who Wrote the Torah According to the Torah?

Jewish and Christian tradition ascribes authorship of the Pentateuch to Moses in the 13th century B.C.E. Is this what the Pentateuch itself implies about who wrote it and when?

Prof.

Christopher A. Rollston

,

,

The Smashing of the Luchot as a Paradigm Shift

Rabbi

Herzl Hefter

,

,

Orthodox Solutions Thus Far

Prof.

Tamar Ross

,

,

The Diatessaron and its Relevance to the Study of the Pentateuch

Editors’ Note: We have asked Dr. Naomi Koltun-Fromm to introduce our readers to an ancient Christian text, known as the Diatessaron, to explain what it is, what it contains, and its significance to biblical studies, particularly the Documentary Hypothesis.

Dr.

Naomi Koltun-Fromm

,

,

Teaching Biblical Scholarship in a Modern Orthodox High School

The personal and educational challenges I faced teaching an introductory course on biblical scholarship to Modern Orthodox high school seniors: What I learned, what my students took home, and some suggestions on how to move forward.

Sara Susswein Tesler

,

,

Meeting the Challenge of Critical Scholarship with Leviticus

Dr. Rabbi

Irving (Yitz) Greenberg

,

,