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Mordechai

But Queen Vashti Refused: Consent and Agency in the Book of Esther

Personal agency and consent—granted or withheld—pervade the book of Esther, and are inextricably related to pre-existing power structures such as gender and social status.

Dr.

Jason Gaines

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Ahasuerus and Vashti: The Story Megillat Esther Does Not Tell You

How the rabbis came to imagine Ahasuerus as a usurper who halted the rebuilding of the Temple and his wife Vashti as a wicked and grotesque Babylonian princess, who lived as a libertine and persecuted Jews.

Dr.

Malka Zeiger Simkovich

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Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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Rabbi

David D. Steinberg

Megillat Esther: Reversing the Legacy of King Saul

One of the main themes in Megillat Esther is the death of Haman, the descendent of Agag, last king of Amalek, at the hands of Mordecai and Esther, Benjaminites from the family of King Saul. Is this just a coincidence?

Prof.

Marc Zvi Brettler

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Unraveling Megillat Esther: How the Story was Developed

A close literary reading reveals the seams of two independent stories: the Harem Intrigue (Esther) and the Court Intrigue (Mordechai) and how they were connected to the festival of Purim.[1]

Prof.

Sara Japhet

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Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

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