Study the Torah with Academic Scholarship

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use

Haggadah

The Four Sons: How the Midrash Developed

In four passages, the Torah has a father explaining different commandments to a son by referencing the exodus from Egypt. Comparing the wording in these biblical passages, the rabbis reinterpreted—and even revised—them to reflect a father explaining Pesach to four different sons: wise, stupid, wicked, and one who doesn’t ask.

Dr. Rabbi

Zev Farber

,

,

Why "Passover"? On the True Meaning of Pesaḥ-פסח

Dr.

Barry Dov Walfish

,

,

The Omission of the Sinai Theophany in the Bikkurim Declaration

Dr. Rabbi

Pamela Barmash

,

,

A Copper Laver Made from Women’s Mirrors

Who were these women and what were these mirrors used for? Reconstructing the narrative: the historical-critical method vs. midrash. 

Dr.

Rachel Adelman

,

,

The Right Way to Read the Haggadah

The Seder as a Night of Hermeneutic Freedom: Introducing the Four Readers of the Haggadah

Dr. Rabbi

Norman Solomon

,

,

Arami Oved Avi: The Demonization of Laban

The rabbis translate the phrase ארמי אובד אבי in Deuteronomy 26:5 “an Aramean tried to destroy my father” and understand it as a reference to Laban, who they claim was worse than Pharaoh. But whereas the biblical Laban can be read either sympathetically or unsympathetically, he is hardly a Pharaoh-like villain, so why demonize him?

Naomi Graetz

,

,

Did an Aramean Try to Destroy our Father?

A medieval non-traditional interpretation of arami oved avi and the push-back against it. 

Prof. Rabbi

Marty Lockshin

,

,

Connecting the Mitzvah of Maggid to the Seder Night

...יָכוֹל מֵראשׁ חֹדֶשׁ? תַּלְמוּד לוֹמַר בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא

Dr.

Azzan Yadin-Israel

,

,